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Advice on painting brick


(Andrew Blackburn) #1

Hello there,
Do you recognise this kind of brick and do you have any experience painting them. Can they be painted successfully?
Thanks in advance

Thanks in advance.


(richardeddington) #2

Hi AndyB
This is a clay brick most of which can be painted. As for the technique I think that A.N. other on TP is better qualified than me to answer. But like anything masonary it needs to be dry and not susceptable to a damp location/situation otherwise the paint will ‘blow’ either from inside out or from surface degradation. Hope this goes some way to helping you.


(Andy Crichton) #3

Consider Keim silicate paint that combines with the brick rather than form a coating. @BenSturges is one to ask for further info


(Andrew Blackburn) #4

South, South East Dorset(near fordingbridge) the property is situated in a low area, near a natural pond on the edge of a wood. There are quiet a few tree’s in the garden near to the property as well. Some of the shaded walls have fungus at ground level which is to be expected, the rest of the face work does look to be drying out quickly now the weather has improved.

Maybe someone can tell me if emulsa bond with permeable masonry paint is suit able to penetrate deep into the brick to get a good hold without sealing ? What I don’t want happening is like Richard said, the paint to startpeeling and blistering and bricks crumblingin a few years, after a lot of rain followed by hard frost
I found a interesting test paper on Fletton brick that mentions soft wire cuts as well. I shall try and post it up for those that may be interested.


(Andrew Blackburn) #5

I’ll sleep well tonight:thumbsup:


(Andrew Blackburn) #6

Has anyone used Earhtborne EcoPro Silcate paint - field testing?
Many thanks


(richardeddington) #7

Hi AndyB
Coming from a construction background I would suggest that the area in which you are working gives a level of concern, mainly because of the location. I would suggest that you advise the client that there could be a problem in future years’ regarding the stability of the product due to the location.
Not want you want to hear but a situation you don’t want to return to.
Belts and braces eh wot!! . Do hope this adds to your consideration but does not deter you. Communication is the by word.
Good luck and I hope I have not given you negative thoughts.


(Andrew Blackburn) #8

Hi Richard, Thankyou for your advice.


(Andrew Blackburn) #9

Andy, I would really appreciate your advice also as to wether there could be issues in the future regarding painting brick in this situation. Do you agree with Richard? I’m all ears. Many thanks


(Andrew Blackburn) #11


(Andy Crichton) #12

Excellent info there, some things are best left unpainted :slight_smile: (although no mention of silicate paints.)

When speccing woodwork painting jobs, and mentioning durability to clients, it is also worth considering if it is a “proper built” house with deep eaves etc . Having followed a spec to the letter, and had premature window paint failures, the first culprits are the paint or timber quality, but if the window reveals are shallow (typical on modern construction) or the roof construction around the soffits and bargeboards is poorly conceived, even the best paint is on a hiding to nothing from the elements, however well applied.


(Andrew Blackburn) #13

Would silicate be compatible with decorators caulk ? Spec sheet says mineral substrates only!
Or would you paint first then go on with sealant, instead of caulk ?


(tehomas ) #14

MAPEI SILANCOLOR EXTERIOR PAINT
Tikkurila Kivitex Silicate Paint
SECILTEK BREATHABLE MASONRY PAINT

these three i have used on lime render to good effect at to weather they would be ok for brick i could not honestly say i have supplied a link to Mike wye where where you mite find what you are looking for