TP Home | About | Newsletter | Blogs |

Brush techniques


(darlic) #1

Anyone looking to improve there brush techniques,heres a tip, but would also be interesting,
to hear other peoples tips? I bought jack pauhl brush guide, and using a wall at home to practise, the results have been pretty good, my son has increased his brush speed by 50
percent,but its took a lot off practise as well, but anyone interested buy the guide, its worth,
it and will pay for itself many times over.


(greenpainting) #2

The way I have improved in all my work has been similar to the philosophy Brian uses in those guides. Basically, if you constantly ask yourself what is stopping you personally, from doing the job better/quicker and make changes accordingly then you will always be improving. That may mean using a different paint, changing the way you hold a brush etc. But the important thing is to always examine the way you work and strive to improve your efficiency and quality.

I told Brian I admire what he’s doing but I won’t give him my money. We all know how to do things better but some people are too afraid to make the changes and be the first to try something new.


(Martin Guest) #3

Brian is a great chap! very analytical and a “scientist” when it comes to our trade/craft… I greatly admire how he is constantly examining how best to achieve the finest of result in the most effective and efficient way possible - it’s a shame that more in the trade don’t follow his methods and add their own twists, it may drag the UK P&D Industry out of the shadows and receive some of the limelight it richly desires…

I think though, that brush technique is the least of the problem and that “professionalism” needs to be examined to even get close to other Geographical Markets such as the Netherlands… But, that’s another lengthy post. :frowning: apologies for the skewed rant!


(darlic) #4

HI folks what’s your best cutting brush for ceilings and trim,I am still finding my
Wooster. Silver tips good but always looking to try new things.chees


(greenpainting) #5

I’m pretty much all for the Minotaur for cutting emulsion now. 2 1/2" angled holds loads of paint but cuts nicely and the handle is comfortable to use. For trim these days I am using a combination of the angled Blaze and the Staalmeester round brushes depending on the profile I’m painting. Neither are perfect but they are as close as I’ve found so far so I will stick with them until something better comes along.