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Paint pad and Helmi 10


(Dave) #1

I have just finished a small project painting the woodwork on a flight of stairs. This included the hall under-stairs cupboard panels and flat banister uprights.

I used the Helmi primer and that went to 7 coats, yes SEVEN coats to achieve the finish I desired. I then used two coats of Helmi 10 and the result was excellent. I know this is nothing new but I used a paint pad and some local professional decorators said I was “bodging it”. I know one of them and the other was his friend. Was I bothered? Was I hell!

I used the pads from here Pro Paint Pad and I found them to be very good. They are foam backed which can be an issue if you push hard, the loaded paint can squeeze out. With that it mind I went with the little and often approach and it worked well. You can get the paint on fast and smooth with very little effort.

Obviously I am not a pro but I do care about obtaining a good finish and doing the job properly. I am not sure about larger areas like walls but I may give it a try in a small room I need to complete as it is only 2.5m x 3m

You may want to try them

Dave


(Andy Crichton) #2

Thanks Dave, no bodging there!

As a guide for next time you contemplate 7 coats of primer:

One of the big moans from old oil painters about waterborne paint is that it has no “guts”. With oil paint, you can let the paint take some of the strain out of preparation, but with waterborne systems you need coat after coat.

That’s the perceived situation anyway. If you read this article from way back, I showed how waterbased gesso is a fair replacement for heavy body oil undercoat, and by paying attention to filling, you can overcome all the shortcomings of waterborne paint’s lack of body.


(Dave) #3

Thanks Andy I was interested in a paint filler so will seek it out.

My mistake was a simple one, I should have sanded the original paint back to wood. Sadly there was about 70 years of paint on it and the bottom colour was an awful orange. The previous coats were uneven so some orange showed through and that caused the issues. I filled and sanded all the holes on a surface that started out like Emmental cheese and ended up like glass. When the primer went on you could see the damn orange so the OCD in me kicked in :yum: and I kept on with the primer.

TBH I found it very therapeutic so no qualms really. I will try the Gesso in the future :sunglasses:

Dave