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Tikkurila Feelings Furniture paint


(Andy Crichton) #1

This is a water-borne acrylate paint used by many of the country’s most prestigious furniture and kitchen manufacturers. Traditional Painter, Mark Nash has a lot of experience with this product, and is happy to talk all day about it.

For instance here he describes how to achieve a perfect finish with Tikkurila Feelings Furniture paint.

So please ask away.


Helmi paint
(Welsh Heritage Decorating) #2

Good stuff Mark, where do you source the Tikkurila from? Just been looking at some websites and think I’ll try a sample. Trying to find someone local who sells it is tricky, so looks like an internet order is on the cards. All the good suppliers are at the other end of the M4


(Mark Nash) #3

Holman specialist paints , Swindon.
Mail order no problem


(James) #4

Mark I’m a keen DIY’er and pay particular attention to detail when I do any job. I’ve been following the numerous posts on TP and feel ready to start painting my kitchen using Tikkurila Feelings Furniture Paint in Wimborne White (my very first kitchen paint job). When you use the sprayer you said not to use softened water. I live in Scotland and our water is naturally very soft so I was wondering if you mean not to use artificially softened water unlike our naturally soft stuff.


(Mark Nash) #5

Hi,
If your using feelings for the first time I would strongly recommend using it as it is from the tin, get used to it , apply it evenly with a very good quality brush with synthetic filaments.
Once you get used to it naturally softened water won’t be a problem, bear in mind you NEED to spray a very FINE mist, no droplets.
Hope this assists you in your project ,
Mark


(James) #6

Thanks for the advice Mark,
The sprayer is the one you recommended in your video and the mist is very fine. I’ll be using Purdy Pro Extra and Monarch Elite brushes and 4" Axus Lime rollers tipping off with a 2" Royal & Langnickel Takalon brush all under 2 coats of Coverstain.
Just one more thing with the Tikkurila paint tin. After releasing the clamps from around the rim of the tin (again following your advice) it doesn’t really seem air tight when the lid is replaced. is this correct or is the seal good enough. You mentioned in video that the newer tins have a rubber seal so I’ve obviously got an older tin.
Any advice greatly received.


(Zen) #7

I have been using the Tillurilla feelings a fair bit and just wanted to add to the conversation that the white has awfull opacity…i bought the tikkurilla undercoat and that is equally poor in coverage.I swapped to Blackfriars problem solving as an undercoat. I have also noticed that in comparison to other acrylic satin or eggshell it is pretty brittle.
It has a nice finish and its ok to put on,but found that floetrol flattens it a bit, it needs a bit of thinning to get rid of brush marks, if you are not moistening the surface with a spray which is not always practical.( i noticed that with colours the pigment can become a bit unstable on contact with droplets of water) i have found the Picasso is the best brush for the job…
I am still not convinced that it is the holy grail of acrylic trim paint and will continue my quest to find a waterborne paint that will work and finish like oil!!


(Chris Graham) #8

I have been using feelings for years, it can be difficult at times especially with the lighter colours, always go on the premise that more thinner coats are better than thick coats and not to use an conditioners unless absolutely necessary.

Droplets of water will dry back as I have had this before.

I would stick with feelings as I have not found anything better.

Chris


(Russ Pike) #9

I have painted kitchens in various white shades in Feelings with the undercoat tinted to match and never had a problem with coverage! I Agree with Chris’s last sentance, its the dogs dangles for sure.


(pd67) #10

I haven’t used Feelings furniture paint but have used the Helmi. I presume it’s the same stuff and I find it excellent. The gloss is the best WB gloss I’ve seen.
Not having any conditioner available I use it neat and find it settles down really well and looks great.

For WB satin finishing like oil it’s got to be BL Satura. A lovely paint.


(Zen) #11

Hi Russ
That’s interesting that you have not had any coverage issues. Have you used it in plain white rather than a shade of? I have opted to use it on a big job I am doing, been there for 8weeks with another 6 to go. I am painting all thd woodwork in feelings.existing Paneled doors and frames new mdf skirts and some new frames. Any patches rubbed back to bare just dont cover using the primer undercoat suggested by tikkurilla.Particularly on sharp edges on the molded frames. How many coats are you getting away with?


(Andy Crichton) #12

There is a reminder in this video from Charlie Budd about sharp edges and surface tension. If the edges arent accepting paint, take the angle off the arris.


(J G Mason Decorator) #13

Zen we have had similar issues with the feelings in Brilliant White, (Painted kitchen units) applied 1 coat of otex primer in white which covered quite well and had to apply 4 coats of the feelings over the otex before it looked really solid we made sure it was stirred well several times while in use plus it was un-thinned.


(Chris Graham) #14

Guys

Tikkurila feelings furniture paint is not great for coverage, so the idea is to build up the colour with the undercoats ie, feelings undercoat or otex.

In the past I have tried just using topcoat, my advice is undercoats all day long, this will give a much better finish.

On a middle coat you could try and do a 30% u/c and70% mix of top coat, again this depends on colours, it makes the top coat flow out nicely.

Chris


(Chris Graham) #15

Also, thinning is essential, going on to thick reduces opacity as it can not flow out on the surface. You also run the risk of excessive build up.

Chris


(pd67) #16

I thin it by heating up the kettle of paint in a container of hot water. That way you’re not messing with the finish


(Andy Crichton) #17

The approach Chris is referring to is along the lines of back in the old days where undercoats were applied to perfection, and then clear varnished for protection. Treat Feelings more as a lacquer than a conventional topcoat paint, get the undercoat / base colour rock solid, and away you go.

There is also a link between that approach and how I think it is best to approach any water based trim finish - focus most on getting the filling and surface preparation spot on and don’t rely on any “filling” help from subsequent waterbased topcoats. Back to front trade practice really compared to what we were doing on site for years, with high build undercoats taking out minor imperfections, topping off with gloss with some body.


(Zen) #18

Hi Andy what is the video you refer to please?
Well i am glad its not just me! 8O
I sussed that to get the finish you have to thin it, so and consequently have to get good coverage from your undercoat, for me using backfriars problem solving, which has been reformualated and is thinner than it used to be but flows well, needs a spot in and then full coat…two coats of tikkurilla feelings over the top of that leaves a great finish.

so it would seem that the old days of relying on two coats of paint to finish the job are long gone…meaning longer on the job and more expensive for the client.

[quote]Quote from Andy Crichton on December 8, 2013, 11:53
There is a reminder in this video from Charlie Budd about sharp edges and surface tension. If the edges arent accepting paint, take the angle off the arris.[/quote]


(Andy Crichton) #19

Hi Zen, you have the finish you want which is the main thing and you spot in, one undercoat overall and 2 tops. Thats OK isnt it? The old oil days we had to do one full undercoat, a second to make sure everything was really solid and a cut above the rest, then a topcoat in gloss. You are working much quicker in water based coatings?

The video is http://youtu.be/lLQC9lInWN0

cheers


(pd67) #20

[quote]Quote from Andy Crichton on December 10, 2013, 13:50

There is also a link between that approach and how I think it is best to approach any water based trim finish - focus most on getting the filling and surface preparation spot on and don’t rely on any “filling” help from subsequent waterbased topcoats. Back to front trade practice really compared to what we were doing on site for years, with high build undercoats taking out minor imperfections, topping off with gloss with some body.[/quote]

What filler do you use over primed woodwork for the best finish prior to more “undercoats” so the top coat is bob on?