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Which Paint Systems to rely on


(dazco) #1

As my aim is to mainly do interiors of domestic properties what would your suggestions be for w/b paint systems for quality finishes and also for the tight budget customer. Your suggestions for me to try of emulsions and trim paints ?

Currently using Jonos Aqua gloss and undercoat for trims, covaplus emulsion for walls and Leyland contact matt for ceilings


(Andy Crichton) #2

There isn’t a one fits all specification, unfortunately, that is part of the job, to assess what needs sorting and then cater for the degree of wear and tear that lies ahead.

First off, you need to have your problem solving primers onboard, Zinsser is your friend (apart from 123 which is patchy results)

If you want to be really efficient and dont want to spend your whole life flip flopping between brands and bargains that turn out not to be bargains, I would set your stall out with premium paints. The reason being, the cost of materials is a small fraction of the overall cost. If you have to apply an extra coat on a ceiling, that will cost you dear in labour, much dearer and harder on your bottom line than the extra 2 litres of paint. (Dont get into the habit of thinking your time doesnt matter, it is all that matters unless you have infinity pills!)

So if you want to get into a nice long run of jobs that just go as expected, ie redecorating walls and ceilings: prep, fill, sand, spot in filler and 2 coats done, on with the woodwork etc, I would head for acrylic based emulsions. Premium paints.

The UK trade tends to call “premium” paint posh paints, designer paints, over priced marketed paints, in the rest of the world they are called standard good paints that do the job. That’s all it comes down to at the end of the day, using paint that does the job right and as expected.

I can only speak for me, I would just get to know Little Greene / Paint Library for most of my paint, and Mylands seem to have nailed the water based woodwork paint for general decorating. That will give you a benchmark and then go exploring from there into the real high spec Scandinavian paints.

On a budget, ask Holmans about their Manor Coatings range. Their vinyl matt paint is how paint used to be before the accountants fiddled and undermined the quality of UK trade paints. James Graham our Associate Painter and Decorator over in Grantham described it as Leyland price range, but more user friendly. No banding, no patchiness, just apply paint as you were taught, and it works. If you remember oil based eggshell how it used to be, thats how it still is with Manor Coatings.

If you have problematic ceilings that need painting white, carry problem solving primers and use them as a sealer and finish combined.

If your current paints work for you, of course you may have hit on a good combination for your market and forget what I just wrote :slight_smile:

All this sort of paint is available by mail order. If you do the maths, you will probably get a shock at the cost of picking up paint yourself.


(dazco) #3

Thank you Andy I will be looking into the Manor coatings. I have color charts and the Little Green site to hand and will do the same for Mylands. Is there any reason for the likes of Dulux, Bedec and Johnstones not in your list,
And which specific Zinsser products for problem solving do you recommend I carry with me for problem ceilings etc?


(Andy Crichton) #4

Zinsser BIN and Coverstain for woodwork issues, and for stains on ceilings, I would consider Mythic Multi Purpose Primer, or Blackfriars Problem Solving Primer, making sure you leave several hours between coats to seal in the stain.

Dulux and Johnstone are in a different department to Bedec who are one of the many small guys doing their bit for high performance paint, I dont know much about them though, they are I believe more established on the East coast and Home Counties, and are in the premium paint arena, but personally I have not come into contact with them. Maybe someone who has used their paint range a lot over a long period of time can put in a word.

Distilling it down, I think the knack is to find a company or two with a range that works, then you get consistency in different scenarios within your line of decorating. Johnstones apparently have upped their game, so maybe that is a place to look for your tighter budget lines, but in general, my feeling is that the mainstream trade paint companies have lost their way a bit/lot because it seems the product lines are mucked about with so regularly, and it turns into a lottery with the latest iteration of basic paints.

This leads on to deciding if you are a shopper who is price driven v value driven, which is an old chestnut on this site. Pay for high levels of consistency, or shop on price and take what comes along and deal with it.

You mention colour charts, a note about colours, try not to be forced into selecting a paint on the basis of the colour. In other words, spec the right paint and then get it mixed in the right colour. So in your armoury you need a top notch colour mixing service.


(darlic) #5

Andy i use bulls eye 123,when you say patchy results,what problems have you come across,i use it when i have done a lot off filling to give the surface a nice base to work on,but haven’t come across any issues yet,what rollers would you recommend with this paint,any tips do you recommend paint conditioner,or to wet the brush ,roller before you use it any tips appreciated.


(darlic) #6

Hi folks do any of you have any feedback on allcoat?Got a room to paint,i no it was used to paint Gatwick airport,read the datasheet
looks impressive stuff.


(Andy Crichton) #7

If you do a search for “allcoat” there is some feedback.

What details do you have of the room you are decorating in case someone else has used it in a similar situation.